EEO-1 Deadline For 2019 & 2020 Now Extended to August 23, 2021

Employers now have some extra time to submit equal employment opportunity (EEO-1) workforce data from 2019 and 2020, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) announced on June 28, 2021. These reports were previously due by July 19, 2021. Employers now have until Aug. 23, 2021, to complete their submissions.

The EEOC’s collection of this data, the portal for which opened on April 26, 2021, had been delayed numerous other times due to the coronavirus pandemic. Under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, the EEO-1 Report is usually due by March 31 every year.

EEO-1 Reporting Background

The EEO-1 Report is an annual survey that requires certain employers to submit data about their workforces by race or ethnicity, gender and job category. The EEOC uses this data to enforce federal anti-discrimination laws.

Employers Subject to EEO-1

Reporting In general, a private-sector employer is subject to EEO-1 reporting if it:

  • Has 100 or more employees;
  • Has 15-99 employees and is part of a group of employers with 100 or more employees; or
  • Is a federal contractor with 50 or more employees and a contract of $50,000 or more.

Employers that are subject to EEO-1 reporting now have until Aug. 23, 2021, to submit data from 2019 and 2020.

Employer Action Items

Employers subject to EEO-1 reporting requirements should ensure that they complete their EEO-1 submissions by Aug. 23, 2021. These employers should also review the EEOC’s home page and website dedicated to EEO data collections for additional information.

Important Dates

  • July 19, 2021: Prior deadline for submission of 2019 and 2020 workforce data.
  • Aug. 23, 2021: New deadline for employers subject to EEO-1 reporting to submit 2019 and 2020 workforce data.
  • March 31, 2022: Deadline for submission of EEO-1 data from 2021.

Employment Practices Liability and the EEOC

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is responsible for enforcing federal laws that make it illegal to discriminate against a job applicant or an employee because of the person’s race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), national origin, age (40 or older), disability or genetic information. It is also illegal to discriminate against a person because the person complained about discrimination, filed a charge of discrimination, or participated in an employment discrimination investigation or lawsuit.

This website is an essential resource for every Business Owner and HR Manager.  You will find useful information, such as enforcement and litigation statistics for all enforceable statutes and real world inquires received by the EEOC’s Legal Counsel.  Data is available by state and type of charge to help you better analyze your organization’s EPL exposure.  Combine this with an in-depth coverage analysis and you will be taking the right steps towards managing your EPLI risk.

EEOC Home Page