Cyber Villains’ Strike Again!

The Verge reported on Wednesday, October 6th, 2021 that cyber villains unknow have struck again!  This time targeting Twitch, an content sharing and streaming platform owned by Amazon. 

The Verge had the following report, which can be found at https://www.theverge.com/2021/10/6/22712250/twitch-hack-leak-data-streamer-revenue-steam-competitor

Twitch source code and creator payouts part of massive leak

The leaked data also includes a Steam competitor

Twitch appears to have been hacked, leaking source code for the company’s streaming service, an unreleased Steam competitor from Amazon Game Studios, and details of creator payouts. An anonymous poster on the 4chan messaging board has released a 125GB torrent, which they claim includes the entirety of Twitch and its commit history.

The poster claims the leak is designed to “foster more disruption and competition in the online video streaming space.” The Verge is able to confirm that the leak is legitimate, and includes code that is as recent as this week. Video Games Chronicle first reported details on the leak earlier today.

Twitch has confirmed it has suffered a data breach, and the company says it’s “working with urgency to understand the extent of this.”

The leak includes the following:

  • 3 years worth of details regarding creator payouts on Twitch.
  • The entirety of twitch.tv, “with commit history going back to its early beginnings.”
  • Source code for the mobile, desktop, and video game console Twitch clients.
  • Code related to proprietary SDKs and internal AWS services used by Twitch.
  • An unreleased Steam competitor from Amazon Game Studios.
  • Data on other Twitch properties like IGDB and CurseForge.
  • Twitch’s internal security tools.

The leak is labelled as “part one,” suggesting there could be more to come. Video Games Chronicle reports that Twitch is aware of the breach, but the company has not yet informed its userbase.

The leak doesn’t appear to include password or address information on Twitch users, but that doesn’t mean this information hasn’t been obtained as part of this breach. In fact, the leaker seems to have focused on sharing Twitch’s own company tools and information, rather than code that would include personal accounts.

While Twitch has confirmed a data breach, it’s still unclear exactly how much data has been stolen. We’d recommend changing your Twitch password and enabling two-factor authentication on your account if you haven’t done so already.

Twitch has been struggling to contain ongoing hate and harassment recently. After weeks of hate raids, some Twitch streamers took a day off in August to protest against the company’s lack of action. Twitch has responded to the #DoBetterTwitch movement, and it’s a hashtag that the anonymous poster has used today to promote this leak.

Updates on the Twitch security incident can be found on the platform’s own website at https://blog.twitch.tv/en/2021/10/06/updates-on-the-twitch-security-incident/

This is Why You Should Double Check Your Cyber Insurance Policy

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Whether a business is in healthcare, accounting, legal, real estate, manufacturing, etc., most of a business’ important assets are digital. (Government municipalities are included too.) To make matters complicated, it’s very common for these digital assets to be stored in various systems and locations, intertwined with a third party’s digital information. With so many opportunities for disaster, steps must be taken to insure this critical information.

Cyber insurance is a new frontier that is rapidly evolving as the industry gets its bearings. Many companies are finding that their current cyber policies have very minimal coverage in case of a cyber breach, and the majority of these policies will not come close to providing the necessary breach coverages to the business or municipality.

When looking at your existing or new cyber policy, it’s important to consider these types of coverages:


As we have come to realize, the idea that security starts and ends with the purchase of a pre-packed firewall is simply misguided

Art Wittman

1. Privacy Breach Notification

Some reports estimate the notification and credit monitoring costs alone are over $100 per record, so if you had 1,000 compromised records, this alone could cost $100,000 or more.

2.Data Loss Restoration

Believe it or not, many large insurance carriers have policy exclusions for the replacement and restoration of data, so be very careful in this area when reviewing your policy.

3. Privacy Liability

This covers for the theft or loss of private information related to customers and other third-party information that is in your care.

4. Regulatory and PCI Defense

Many industries are under strict regulatory control, and breaches may result in fines and other penalties from these regulatory agencies.

5. Public Relations

If an enterprise has a breach, the bad press they receive can do significant long term reputational damage and can also be used by competitors to their advantage. This coverage will help hire a public relations firm to mitigate the reputational damage your name brand might incur.

6. Cyber Crime

If your organization is threatened with various cyber threats such as malicious code that will result in financial loss or data loss, this coverage is needed for the reimbursement of the costs associated with these threats.

7. Defense and Settlement costs

A breach affecting a lot of customers may result in lawsuits and financial settlements, so insurance coverage is needed to offset these potentially enormous costs.

8. Consulting and Forensic Fees

If a breach does occur, the upfront investigative process will require a lot of professional expertise and a lot of money, and this specific coverage will offset these significant costs.

9. Business Continuity

If a hack causes your business to lose income, this coverage will reimburse you for these losses.

It takes 20 years to build a brand or company reputation and a few minutes within a cyber incident to ruin it

Stephane Nappo

For a free cyber insurance policy evaluation, contact Libertate Insurance today at 813-367-7574 or email me, James Buscarini at jbuscarini@libertateins.com.

Our professionals are happy to review and discuss your firm’s existing cyber liability insurance policy and the relation to your unique business requirements, needs and cyber coverage. Our goal is to help your PEO and client companies navigate the cyber liability insurance landscape and identify potential vulnerabilities that could be exposed based on your existing technology network and infrastructure. Finally, we want to make sure that in the event of a ransomware attack, business email compromise or phishing expedition your firm has adequate coverage in each of the areas that you might be vulnerable to be targeted in.

The Risk with Search Engines

It’s no secret that your technology company depends on the capabilities of your computer systems to function. You should be aware that simple actions your employees take could be putting your company’s equipment and networks at risk of cyber-crime, including cyber-attacks, cyber theft and other computer security incidents. The average cost of a single cyber-attack is incalculable—cyber-attacks can directly target finances and ruin a business’ reputation. Your business is at stake, and you should do everything you can to protect yourself.


The Risks of Web Searches

As an employer, you should educate your employees about searching for certain topics on the internet due to the risk of coming across websites encrypted with viruses or malware that could be detrimental to your computer systems. Stress that the potential for cybercrime could affect employees individually as well as the business as a whole. More than 90 percent of companies surveyed by the DOJ incurred either monetary loss, system downtime loss or both because of cybercrime, so take it upon yourself to put search engine guidelines in place.


The Web’s Most Dangerous Search Terms

Common term searches conducted online one can expose your business to the risk of cyber-crime. Encourage employees to avoid following suspicious results in search engines. Any result that promises free products or materials is suspect. The least risky search terms are usually health-related topics and searches about economic news. It is essential to remember that the number of dangerous search terms is ever changing. Hackers want to impact

the highest amount of people with the least amount of effort, so they aim for popular search terms most. Ill-intentioned hackers also adapt quickly to the fast-paced nature of the internet and the public circle, so oftentimes social or celebrity events popular at a given moment climb quickly to the top of the internet’s most dangerous search terms and are a high risk for infecting your company’s computers. According to the DOJ, industries considered a part of critical infrastructure businesses account for a


Simple actions your employees take could put your company’s equipment and networks at risk of cyber-crime, including cyber-attack, cyber theft and other computer security incidents.


disproportionate amount of computer security incidents. If your company is in any of these industries, be especially careful about internet searches to ensure computer safety and protect against potentially devastating loss, both monetary and in down time:

  • Agriculture
  • Chemical and drug manufacturing
  • Computer system design
  • Finance
  • Health care
  • Internet service providers
  • Petroleum mining and manufacturing
  • Publications/broadcasting
  • Real estate
  • Telecommunications
  • Transportation and pipelines

Take Precautions to Protect Your Business


There are examples of companies and organizations around the globe that had to shut down operations to address a large-scale virus or other malware issue. These problems can affect both large and small businesses and can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars to fix. Avoid putting yourself at risk by doing the following:

  • Enact a stricter internet use policy
  • Put more strict website blockers or filters in place
  • Educate employees about the hazards that risky search engine exploration can present

Some of these solutions may cost you in the short run but lowering your risk will ultimately save your company in potential identity fraud, monetary cyber theft or informational cyber theft in the future.

Insurers Are Waking Up to Multi-Factor Authentication

Please enjoy this excellent article by Steven Kaye which was originally posted on the Carrier Management website. The original post can be found here.

Insurance use cases for multi-factor authentication (MFA) include distributor access, external user access (e.g., claims vendors, financial advisers), internal user access and policyholder access.

Legislation and regulators are increasingly mandating MFA to ensure greater security as well as to reduce identity theft and other forms of fraud. Examples include the New York State cybersecurity regulation and the NAIC Insurance Data Security Model Law. Insurers have traditionally balanced security against expense and inconvenience to their users, especially if their coverages are marketed to older demographics (e.g., final expense policies). Regulatory mandates combined with growing digital adoption and criminals turning their eyes to life and annuities account takeover means the calculus has changed.

Despite these regulatory mandates, 80 percent of insurers say that risk management, rather than regulatory compliance, is driving their adoption of MFA.

There is minimal variation between size and sector of company when it comes to deployment rates, with the exception of large life/annuity/benefits insurers, which are much more likely to use MFA for policyholders than is any other class of insurer. A low deployment rate of MFA for policyholders among smaller property/casualty insurers reflects the fact that few small P/C insurers offer direct policyholder access at all.

Midsize P/C insurers lag behind other sizes and sectors in deployment of MFA for both distributors and policyholders but are ahead of large life/annuity/benefits insurers in deployment for other external parties. Midsize P/C insurers are also ahead of midsize life/annuity/benefits insurers in deployment internally.

How MFA Helps

As many knowledge workers moved from the office to home during the pandemic, securing infrastructure became another key driver. Hybrid work models that blend office and home working environments are gaining traction, and the need for MFA becomes more crucial to validate that users are actually employees.

In addition to security needs, carriers are obtaining policyholder emails and cellphone numbers as part of the MFA process. These bits of data, which are often difficult to obtain, can provide insurers with the opportunity to digitally connect with customers in their preferred channel.

There is no mandated number of identification methods for MFA, but the consensus is to have two at a minimum. Insurers are starting to use multi-factor or its equivalent for any interaction where an external network is accessing information behind a firewall. Some are taking this a step further to include role-based authentication for internal access as well.

The best defense is a layered approach, combining multiple authentication methods with secure and documented business processes and other security solutions. Some insurers are offering security audit services to agents they work with, while others are working with their distribution executives to change distribution agreements to mandate MFA and other security measures.

Insurers should ensure that MFA processes are documented and that solutions generate auditable logs. Some wholesale brokers require attestations from insurers they work with.Some insurers are offering security audit services to agents they work with, while others are working with their distribution executives to change distribution agreements to mandate MFA and other security measures.

For consumer-facing use cases, depending on the age of policyholders, insurers may wish to opt for MFA methods that are more straightforward (e.g., less complex knowledge-based authentication, voice print). Final expense and Medicare supplement are two lines of business where voice signatures are well established. Many solutions support establishing different access policies based on risk assessment, such as requiring MFA for new devices, or conversely accepting password-free authentication for low-risk access requests.

Types of Authentication

MFA relies on several of the following authentication methods:

  • Physical objects (e.g., laptops, mobile devices, security tokens) in possession of users.
  • Knowledge-based authentication (e.g., answers to questions, passwords or PIN codes, randomly generated authentication codes from authenticator apps).
  • Location (e.g., GPS or IP address).
  • User characteristics (behavioral or biometrics-based).

Some authentication methods are more secure than others. For example, sending codes or passwords via email or SMS runs the risk of interception by man-in-the-middle attacks. With many employees working from home, phishing and other identity theft methods are on the rise. Several solutions support adaptive authentication, with less risky access requests requiring fewer authentication methods than riskier ones, as determined by system-generated risk scoring and predefined security policies.20 percent of CIOs surveyed by Novarica said they are planning to require MFA for distributors and policyholders within six months, adding to 30 percent that already do so.

Novarica recently conducted a survey of insurer CIOs to understand their deployment of MFA, including business drivers, authentication methods and use cases. It is important to keep in mind that solution providers typically offer a range of authentication methods.

Only 30 percent of participants currently require MFA for distributors or policyholders, but another 20 percent are planning to require MFA within six months. Roughly 80 percent of participants require MFA for most or all internal systems users.

Deploying MFA

The most common authentication methods deployed are mobile authenticator apps, used by 80 percent of participants. More than half of participants use SMS. Email and security keys are used by roughly 40 percent and 33 percent of participants, respectively. Behavioral authentication, voice-based authentication, IP location and knowledge-based authentication are used by fewer than a third of insurers.

Note that only 16 percent of insurers report using just one method; overall, insurers said they use an average of 2.8 different authentication methods.Sending codes or passwords via email or SMS runs the risk of interception by man-in-the-middle attacks.

The security threat landscape continues to grow in number and impact. Although many carriers are not currently considering MFA, regulatory scrutiny and enforcement of IT security will only increase. The ability of most solutions to offer different levels of authentication for different access use cases means there is less of a tradeoff between customer experience and security. Many solution providers offer MFA as part of a broader portfolio of identity and access management and IT security solutions.

Insurers should consider MFA approaches as part of a broader IT security strategy.

CONTRIBUTOR

Steven Kaye, Novarica

Steven Kaye is Vice President of Research at Novarica and lead editor of the firm’s Business and Technology Trends in Insurance series. He has managed a wide range of research projects since joining the firm in 2008. Previously, Kaye worked for Accenture as an insurance researcher focused on the U.S. life and property/casualty markets. He also served in both knowledge management and research roles at Gemini Consulting (now part of Capgemini) for several of the firm’s industry practices. Kaye holds MILS and BA degrees from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. Reach him directly at skaye@novarica.com.

Challenges or opportunities for brokers placing cyber risk

Content used to write this post was originally written by NU Property Casualty 360’s Managing Editor, Ms. Heather A. Turner

According to a Guidewire report the numbers for cybercrime in 2020, have almost doubled! In addition to an increase in attacks and breaches are the related budgetary allocations being made by small to mid-sized businesses for cyber insurance over the next 2 years. Ramping up cyber sturdy tools and in an effort to prevent cyber attacks are a necessary play in prevention for the ever evolving cyber market and being fought across the property and casualty landscape.


According to a report published by CyberCube, a data-driven cyber analytics company for the insurance industry, the growing cyber market is creating unique opportunities for brokers to set themselves apart from their competitors. By marrying their existing areas of expertise with their new found and or improved fundamental comprehension of insurable cyber risk and exposure, brokers can show and or remind buyers and prospects alike why they are indispensable.

The following list was created by CyberCube to further explore examples of challenges and opportunities brokers face in the cyber market today.

Click here to read the detail following Opportunities 1-4 written by Heather A. Turner, of NU Property Casualty 360. You must register for free account.

  • Opportunity No. 1: Brokers are trusted advisors
  • Opportunity No. 2: Brokers can add value by mapping exposure to coverages and policy terms.
  • Opportunity No. 3: Getting a “yes” from insurers.
  • Opportunity No.4: Standalone cyber is just one aspect of a well rounded insurance program.

Protecting Your Organization Against Cyber Attacks

In today’s world everyone is susceptible to cyber attacks. In recent years, cyber attacks have emerged as one the more significant threats facing organizations of all sizes. According to a recent report from the information Systems Audit and Controls Association (ISACA), cyberattacks currently reign as the fastest growing form of crime. Some of the most common cyber attacks from 2020 were social engineering, ransomware, software update issues and web application attacks. These attacks can carry serious consequences for your organization-including lost data, disrupted operations, revenue loss, and legal fees. Consider the following measures to protect your organization from ransomware attacks:

Educate your employees. The biggest threat to your cyber security is your employees. According to historical claim data analyzed by Willis Towers Watson, 90% of all cyber claims stemmed from some type of employee error or behavior. Train your employees on how to prevent and respond to a malware attack.

Implement smart software. Install strong spam filters, anti-virus and malware programs, firewalls and patch management systems on all devices.

Enforce access controls. Only allow trusted, competent and qualified individuals access to sensitive systems or data. Such as multi-factor authentication, VPN and remote desktop protocol.

Ensure business continuity. Be sure to back up data frequently. In additional, conduct annual penetration testing and vulnerability assessments.

Ensure adequate coverage. It’s crucial to secure proper insurance coverage to stay protected in the event of a cyberattack. After all, even with proper cybersecurity measures in place, attacks can still occur.

The below link is a Cyber Risk Exposure Scorecard. After completing all of the questions, total the score to determine your organization’s level of cyber risk.

At Libertate, we want to insure that every organization is protected and prepared. We offer the following solutions and services for PEO’s and their client companies.

  • We have access to over 25 cyber carriers for the PEO.
  • Master cyber programs to protect PEO client companies.
  • Incident response platform to help identify cybersecurity issues. The cloud based platform has a 100% detection and close ratio. It is also backed by a $250K warranty should it fail the end user.
  • Our experts can evaluate your current cyber coverage that is placed outside of our agency.

For additional cyber security guidance and insurance solutions, contact us today at sales@libertateins.com.

Q4 2020 Cyber Risks & Liabilities Update

Some important trends that are threatening our businesses and ways to protect yourself.

How to Avoid Electronic Signing Service Scams

Although utilizing an electronic signing service can be a convenient way for your organization to digitally sign and exchange important documents (e.g., contracts, tax documents and legal materials) with stakeholders, doing so also carries significant cybersecurity risks.

Cybercriminals can utilize a variety of scamming techniques to trick electronic signing service users into sharing sensitive information, such as their signature, financial information and other personal data. From there, the criminals can use that information for a range of destructive purposes—including identity theft and other costly forms of fraud. These scams have become an increasingly prevalent threat in the midst of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, as many organizations have transitioned to fully remote operations.

In fact, DocuSign—a popular electronic signing service provider—recently released a statement regarding several new phishing scams that cybercriminals have implemented to fool victims into thinking they are using DocuSign’s services. These scams entail the victim receiving a fraudulent email that appears to be from DocuSign, urging them to either click on a malicious link (which then downloads malware on the individual’s device) or provide their personal information (which scammers then access to commit fraud).

Whether your organization uses DocuSign or a different electronic signing service, it’s important to educate yourself and your stakeholders—including employees, investors, customers and suppliers—on how to detect and avoid falling victim to these phishing scams. That being said, consider the following cybersecurity tips:

  • Be wary of responding to emails that claim to be an electronic signature request—especially if you weren’t expecting a request or don’t recognize the name of the individual or organization sending the request. Trusted senders would let you know they are sending a signature request before doing so.
  • Never click on links from electronic signature emails that appear suspicious—especially if the URLs for those links redirect to websites that aren’t secure or recognizable.
  • Review electronic signature emails for generic wording, grammatical errors and misspellings (both in the body of the email and within the sender’s email address). These mistakes are often key indicators of a phishing scam.

Cybersecurity Trends to Prepare for in 2021

This past year saw a wide range of changes and advancements in workplace technology utilization for organizations of varying sectors and sizes. But as digital offerings continue to evolve, so do cybersecurity threats. That’s why it’s crucial to remain up-to-date on the latest technology trends and adjust your cyber risk management strategies accordingly. As your organization starts to prepare for 2021, keep the following emerging cybersecurity concerns in mind:

  • Remote work issues—While remote working is a valuable method for protecting staff from the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, this practice can also lead to increased cybersecurity vulnerabilities for your organization. After all, many employees may not have the same security capabilities in their work-from-home arrangements as they do in the workplace. As such, make sure your organization provides remote staff with appropriate cybersecurity training and resources, as well as implements effective workplace policies and procedures regarding cybersecurity.   
  • Cloud hijacking concerns—Especially with more employees working from home than ever before, maintaining cloud security is crucial. Cloud breaches have become more common in the past year, as cybercriminals have developed a method for hijacking cloud infrastructures via credential-stealing malware. To avoid this concern, utilize trusted anti-malware software and update this software regularly.   
  • Elevated ransomware threats—Cybercriminals continue to create new and improved ransomware attack methods each year. According to recent research from Cybersecurity Ventures, ransomware attacks are expected to cost organizations more than $20 billion in 2021, with an attack estimated to take place every 11 seconds. To help protect your organization from ransomware attacks, use a virtual private network, place security filters on your email server and educate staff on ransomware prevention.
  • Data privacy expectations—As more and more organizations start storing sensitive information on digital platforms, data privacy is a growing concern. If your organization stores sensitive information digitally, it’s vital to utilize proper security techniques to protect such data (e.g., encryption) and abide by all relevant data privacy regulations.
  • Skills shortages—Despite ongoing advancements in workplace technology, cybersecurity skills shortages have become a major issue for many organizations—with the demand for cybersecurity professionals exceeding the number of individuals that are qualified for such a role. This shortage emphasizes the importance of investing in effective cybersecurity tools across all workplace devices to help minimize your risks. 

With these trends in mind, it’s important now more than ever for your organization to secure adequate cyber insurance. Otherwise, you run the risk of your organization lacking the appropriate coverage and dealing with hefty out-of-pocket costs in the event of a cyber incident.

Smart Device Security Best Practices

As remote work continues to be a popular offering for many organizations, some employees have begun taking advantage of their own smart devices—such as smartphones or tablets—for work-related purposes.

While this practice can certainly help employees expand their remote work capabilities, utilizing smart devices within a work setting can lead to elevated cybersecurity risks. This is because your employees’ smart devices may not be initially equipped with the security measures necessary to defend against cybercriminals, thus increasing the likelihood of a cyberattack taking place.

Don’t let employees’ smart devices lead to a cybersecurity disaster within your organization. Utilize the following guidance to promote smart device security:

  • Establish a Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) policy that includes standards employees must uphold when using their smart devices for work-related purposes.
  • Have employees create complex passwords for their smart devices. Encourage staff to enable multifactor authentication on their devices, if possible.
  • Restrict employees from connecting to public Wi-Fi networks on their smart devices. Be sure to establish a virtual private network for staff to use to ensure a safe, secure connection.

Have employees conduct routine software updates on their smart devices to prevent potential security gaps.

For additional cybersecurity guidance and coverage, contact Libertate Insurance today, we are offering Cybersecurity Programs.

Cyber Crime Continues to Rise. Are you protected?

October is National Cybersecurity Awareness Month and a good time to insure your business is protected. The continued rise in the amount of information stored and transferred electronically has resulted in a remarkable increase in the potential exposures facing businesses. In an age where a stolen laptop or hacked account can instantly compromise the personal data of thousands of customers, or an ill-advised post on a social media site can be read by hundreds in a matter of minutes, protecting yourself from cyber liability is just as important as some of the more traditional exposures businesses account for in their general commercial liability policies.

Why Cyber Liability Insurance?

A traditional business liability policy is extremely unlikely to protect against most cyber exposures. Standard commercial policies are written to insure against injury or physical loss and will do little, if anything, to shield you from electronic damages and the associated costs they may incur. Exposures are vast, ranging from the content you put on your website to stored customer data. Awareness of the potential cyber liabilities your company faces is essential to managing risk through proper coverage.

Possible exposures covered by a typical cyber liability policy may include the following:

  • Data breaches: Increased government regulations have placed more responsibility on companies to protect clients’ personal information. In the event of a breach, notification of the affected parties is now required by law. This will add to costs that will also include security fixes, identity theft protection for the affected and protection from possible legal action. While companies operating online are at a heightened risk, even companies that don’t transmit personal data over the internet, but still store it in electronic form, could be susceptible to breaches through data lost to unauthorized employee access or hardware theft.
  • Intellectual property rights: Your company’s online presence, whether it be through a corporate website, blogs or social media, opens you up to some of the same exposures faced by publishers. This can include libel, copyright or trademark infringement and defamation, among other things.
  • Damages to a third-party system: If an email sent from your server has a virus that crashes the system of a customer, or the software your company distributes fails, resulting in a loss for a third party, you could be held liable for the damages.
  • System failure: A natural disaster, malicious activity or fire could all cause physical damages that could result in data or code loss. While the physical damages to your system hardware would be covered under your existing business liability policy, data or code loss due to the incident would not be.
  • Cyber extortion: Hackers can hijack websites, networks and stored data, denying access to you or your customers. They often demand money to restore your systems to working order. This can cause a temporary loss of revenue plus generate costs associated with paying the hacker’s demands or rebuilding if damage is done.
  • Business interruption: If your primary business operations require the use of computer systems, a disaster that cripples your ability to transmit data could cause you, or a third party that depends on your services, to lose potential revenue. From a server failure to a data breach, such an incident can affect your day-to-day operations. Time and resources that normally would have gone elsewhere will need to be directed towards the problem, which could result in further losses. This is especially important as denial of service attacks by hackers have been on the rise. Such attacks block access to certain websites by either rerouting traffic to a different site or overloading an organizations server.

Cyber liability insurance is specifically designed to address the risks that come with using modern technology; risks that other types of business liability coverage simply won’t. The level of coverage your business needs is based on your individual operations and can vary depending on your range of exposure. It is important to work with a broker that can identify your areas of risk so a policy can be tailored to fit your unique situation.

Libertate Insurance, Your Coverage Guide

As reliance on technology continues to increase, new exposures continue to emerge. As your business grows, make sure your cyber liability coverage grows with it. Libertate Insurance is here to help you analyze your needs and make the right coverage decisions to protect your operations from unnecessary risk.