Parent Company of PEO Carrier Key Risk Reports Another Strong Quarter!

Kudos to our friends at W.R. Berkley for a stellar Q2! So happy they are a part of our PEO community.

W.R. Berkley Corp. reported net premium growth exceeding 27 percent and a combined ratio under 90 for the 2021 second quarter, positive results the commercial lines insurer and reinsurer attributed to rate adequacy and an improving economy.

Consolidated net premiums written during Q2 surpassed $2.2 billion, up from $1.7 billion in the 2020 second quarter.

The company booked net income of more than $237 million in Q2 versus $71.2 million a year ago.

Additionally, net investment income jumped nearly 97 percent to $169.2 million during the quarter.

The company said that its rate increases continue to outpace loss costs, with new products also helping to achieve or exceed its targeted rate levels. During the quarter, W.R. Berkley focused on exposure growth and business expansion, and it said the strategy should help lead to additional underwriting profits down the line.

W.R. Berkley’s consolidated combined ratio was 89.7 during the quarter, compared to 98.7 a year ago.

W.R. Berkley even produced gains for workers’ compensation, which had average rate increases of just under 10 percent.

Commercial auto and casualty reinsurance also saw large premium increases. Professional liability was among the largest gainers, jumping to $287 million in net premiums written during Q2, versus $174.2 million the year before.

Current accident year insurance losses from catastrophes, including COVID-related losses, landed at $36.8 billion during the quarter, improved from $114 million in the 2020 second quarter. Reinsurance and monoline excess losses were just under $7.2 million, compared to $31.8 million a year ago.

Source: W.R. Berkley

This is Why You Should Double Check Your Cyber Insurance Policy

Image

Whether a business is in healthcare, accounting, legal, real estate, manufacturing, etc., most of a business’ important assets are digital. (Government municipalities are included too.) To make matters complicated, it’s very common for these digital assets to be stored in various systems and locations, intertwined with a third party’s digital information. With so many opportunities for disaster, steps must be taken to insure this critical information.

Cyber insurance is a new frontier that is rapidly evolving as the industry gets its bearings. Many companies are finding that their current cyber policies have very minimal coverage in case of a cyber breach, and the majority of these policies will not come close to providing the necessary breach coverages to the business or municipality.

When looking at your existing or new cyber policy, it’s important to consider these types of coverages:


As we have come to realize, the idea that security starts and ends with the purchase of a pre-packed firewall is simply misguided

Art Wittman

1. Privacy Breach Notification

Some reports estimate the notification and credit monitoring costs alone are over $100 per record, so if you had 1,000 compromised records, this alone could cost $100,000 or more.

2.Data Loss Restoration

Believe it or not, many large insurance carriers have policy exclusions for the replacement and restoration of data, so be very careful in this area when reviewing your policy.

3. Privacy Liability

This covers for the theft or loss of private information related to customers and other third-party information that is in your care.

4. Regulatory and PCI Defense

Many industries are under strict regulatory control, and breaches may result in fines and other penalties from these regulatory agencies.

5. Public Relations

If an enterprise has a breach, the bad press they receive can do significant long term reputational damage and can also be used by competitors to their advantage. This coverage will help hire a public relations firm to mitigate the reputational damage your name brand might incur.

6. Cyber Crime

If your organization is threatened with various cyber threats such as malicious code that will result in financial loss or data loss, this coverage is needed for the reimbursement of the costs associated with these threats.

7. Defense and Settlement costs

A breach affecting a lot of customers may result in lawsuits and financial settlements, so insurance coverage is needed to offset these potentially enormous costs.

8. Consulting and Forensic Fees

If a breach does occur, the upfront investigative process will require a lot of professional expertise and a lot of money, and this specific coverage will offset these significant costs.

9. Business Continuity

If a hack causes your business to lose income, this coverage will reimburse you for these losses.

It takes 20 years to build a brand or company reputation and a few minutes within a cyber incident to ruin it

Stephane Nappo

For a free cyber insurance policy evaluation, contact Libertate Insurance today at 813-367-7574 or email me, James Buscarini at jbuscarini@libertateins.com.

Our professionals are happy to review and discuss your firm’s existing cyber liability insurance policy and the relation to your unique business requirements, needs and cyber coverage. Our goal is to help your PEO and client companies navigate the cyber liability insurance landscape and identify potential vulnerabilities that could be exposed based on your existing technology network and infrastructure. Finally, we want to make sure that in the event of a ransomware attack, business email compromise or phishing expedition your firm has adequate coverage in each of the areas that you might be vulnerable to be targeted in.

AM Best Assigns Credit Rating to Sunz Insurance Company

Congrats to our friends at Sunz for the A- (Excellent) rating!

Sunz Insurance

OLDWICK, N.J., July 16, 2021–(BUSINESS WIRE)–AM Best has assigned a Financial Strength Rating of A- (Excellent) and a Long-Term Issuer Credit Rating of “a-” (Excellent) to SUNZ Insurance Company (SUNZ) (Bradenton, FL). The outlook assigned to these Credit Ratings (ratings) is stable.

The ratings reflect SUNZ’s balance sheet strength, which AM Best assesses as very strong, as well as its adequate operating performance, limited business profile and appropriate enterprise risk management (ERM).

SUNZ was formed in 2005 and primarily writes high deductible worker’s compensation coverage utilizing its proprietary technology-driven platform focused on collateral management for its medium and small business clients.

SUNZ’s balance sheet assessment is supported by its risk-adjusted capitalization as measured by Best’s Capital Adequacy Ratio (BCAR) in current periods, projected future scores, and under stress scenarios. SUNZ balance sheet assessment also considers the capital contributions in support of recent premium growth, improved reserving patterns exhibited during the recent five-year period, its comprehensive reinsurance program diversified among highly rated participants, and a conservative investment portfolio that matches assets with liabilities.

SUNZ’s operating performance is assessed as adequate as evidenced by average pre-tax return on revenue measures that trail AM Best’s workers’ compensation industry composite over the recent five- and 10-year timeframe. SUNZ’s business profile assessment is limited as 49.9% of premiums are written in two states, California and Florida, when considering both direct and assumed premiums. Operating as a single line workers’ compensation insurer, SUNZ’s limited business profile exposes the company to the potential legislative, regulatory or judicial changes occurring within these states. SUNZ’s ERM approach is considered appropriate for the scale, scope and complexity of the organization.

While positive rating actions are unlikely over the near term, positive rating actions could be taken on SUNZ’s ratings should operating performance improve and be sustained at a level that is in line with peers with stronger operating performance assessments.

Key factors that could result in negative rating actions on SUNZ’s ratings and outlooks include a weakening in operating earnings to a level that is not supportive of the adequate operating performance assessment.

Negative rating actions could occur should adverse reserve development or strong premium growth result in a weakening in risk-adjusted capitalization that falls short of supporting the very strong balance sheet assessment.

This press release relates to Credit Ratings that have been published on AM Best’s website. For all rating information relating to the release and pertinent disclosures, including details of the office responsible for issuing each of the individual ratings referenced in this release, please see AM Best’s Recent Rating Activity web page. For additional information regarding the use and limitations of Credit Rating opinions, please view Guide to Best’s Credit Ratings. For information on the proper use of Best’s Credit Ratings, Best’s Preliminary Credit Assessments and AM Best press releases, please view Guide to Proper Use of Best’s Ratings & Assessments.

AM Best is a global credit rating agency, news publisher and data analytics provider specializing in the insurance industry. Headquartered in the United States, the company does business in over 100 countries with regional offices in London, Amsterdam, Dubai, Hong Kong, Singapore and Mexico City. For more information, visit www.ambest.com.

Copyright © 2021 by A.M. Best Rating Services, Inc. and/or its affiliates. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210716005296/en/

Contacts

Gordon McLean
Senior Financial Analyst

+1 908 439 2200, ext. 5304
gordon.mclean@ambest.com

Robert Raber
Director
+1 908 439 2200, ext. 5696
robert.raber@ambest.com

Christopher Sharkey
Manager, Public Relations
+1 908 439 2200, ext. 5159
christopher.sharkey@ambest.com

Jim Peavy
Director, Communications
+1 908 439 2200, ext. 5644
james.peavy@ambest.com

White House Issues Ransomware Prevention Guidance to Businesses

In a recent letter addressed to corporate executives and business leaders, the White House emphasized that
bolstering the nation’s resilience against cyberattacks is a main priority for President Joe Biden’s administration.
Specifically, as ransomware attacks continue to rise in both cost and frequency throughout the country, the
federal government is urging businesses to take this evolving cyber threat seriously.

These attacks—which entail a cybercriminal deploying malicious software to compromise a business’s network or
sensitive data and demand a large payment be made before restoring this technology or information—have
quickly become a growing concern across industry lines. In fact, the latest research provides that ransomware
attacks have increased by nearly 150% in the past year alone, with the median ransom payment demand
totaling $178,000 and the average overall loss from such an attack exceeding $1 million.

While the White House has begun working with both domestic and international partners on various strategies to
prevent ransomware attacks, the Biden administration is also encouraging businesses to play their part in
minimizing this rising cyber concern. Rather than viewing ransomware attacks as a minor cyber risk, the federal
government is instructing businesses to view these attacks as a significant exposure—one with the potential to
wreak havoc on their key operations.

As such, the Biden administration is recommending that businesses convene with their senior leadership teams
to review their ransomware exposures and implement these top cybersecurity measures:


  • Utilize the federal government’s best practices. Businesses should be sure to incorporate the best
    practices outlined in the Biden administration’s Executive Order on Improving the Nation’s Cybersecurity. This
    includes the following practices:
    o Implementing multi-factor (MFT) authentication on all workplace technology
    o Leveraging endpoint detection and response tools to identify and deter suspicious network activity
    o Encrypting sensitive data to make it less accessible to cybercriminals
    o Developing a trusted and skilled workplace cybersecurity team
  • Ensure an effective incident response plan. All businesses should have cyber incident response plans in
    place. These plans outline proper response protocols and offer steps for minimizing potential damages during
    cyberattacks. Businesses should make sure to include several ransomware attack scenarios within their
    response plans and routinely test these scenarios with their cybersecurity teams. Based on test results,
    businesses should revise their response plans accordingly.
  • Conduct frequent data backups. In addition to the federal government’s best practices, businesses should
    also prioritize securely backing up all sensitive data, images and other important files on a regular basis.
    Conducting such backups can help businesses remain operational and continue to access crucial data in the
    event that any workplace technology is compromised in a ransomware attack. Data backups should remain
    offline (not connected to key business networks) and be routinely tested.
  • Keep critical networks separated. In order to keep ransomware attacks from fully disrupting their operations, businesses should attempt to segment their various workplace networks (e.g., sales production, and corporate) from one another rather than having a unified network. Access to each network should be restricted to those who use them to conduct their job tasks. Networks should only allow internet access as needed. That way, businesses can avoid becoming completely compromised by single-network ransomware attacks and continue performing critical functions.

  • Maintain updated security software. To help safeguard workplace technology from ransomware threats,
    businesses should equip their systems and devices with adequate security software—such as antivirus
    programs, firmware protections and firewalls. Further, this software must be regularly updated to remain
    effective. That being said, businesses should also consider utilizing centralized patch management systems to
    keep security software on a consistent update schedule.
  • Review workplace cyber security protocols. Apart from testing their response plans, businesses should
    also regularly assess whether their existing workplace cybersecurity policies, procedures and software are
    sufficient in protecting against current risks—such as ransomware threats. In particular, businesses should
    consider using a third-party penetration tester to review their ransomware defense tactics and overall
    cybersecurity capabilities. Businesses should work with their trusted cybersecurity teams and IT experts to
    make workplace adjustments as needed (e.g., updating policies or purchasing new security software).

For additional risk management guidance and insurance solutions email me James Buscarini, PCA at jbuscarini@libertateins.com or call me at 813.367.7574.

Disciplining or Terminating Employees With Open Workers’ Compensation Claims

Can an employer discipline or terminate an employee who has an open workers’ compensation claim? This is a common question that many employers ask. The answer depends on which state the company is located in, why the employee is being disciplined or terminated and the nature of the workers’ compensation claim. Let’s look at an example.

Say an employee is insubordinate to their supervisor, and this issue has occurred more than once. While the employee has been reprimanded, they continue to disobey company policies or procedures. However, the employee has an open workers’ compensation claim from an occupational injury. As a result, the employer may question whether they can continue to discipline or terminate the employee due to poor behavior.

Review this article to learn more about when an employer can discipline or terminate employees with open workers’ compensation claims.

What Is an Open Workers’ Compensation Claim?

In general, an open workers’ compensation claim can mean that an occupational injury or illness is currently being treated, benefits are still being paid, rehabilitation is in process or the employee has not yet reached maximum medical improvement.

Workers’ compensation claims can stay open for several years, depending on how severe the injury or illness was and what the treatment for that ailment entails.  

If an employee’s claim is still open, this generally means that the claim is still active in the workers’ compensation system.

When Can an Employer Discipline or Terminate?

While employers cannot retaliate against their employees for filing workers’ compensation claims, this does not mean that they are unable to discipline or terminate an employee who has an open claim. There are various reasons as to why an employer could discipline or terminate an employee. For example, an employer could potentially be permitted to discipline or terminate an employee with an open workers’ compensation claim in these circumstances:

  • After obtaining permanent restrictions, the employee can no longer complete the job tasks that were initially assigned to them.
  • Company-wide layoffs are necessary.
  • Leading up to their injury or illness, the employee had poor work performance, and this issue was properly documented.

However, it’s important to remember that employers must have detailed documentation and be consistent in their practices with all employees. In addition, employers must ensure that they are not violating any other laws when disciplining or terminating an employee. After all, just because there is no issue with workers’ compensation laws, does not mean there won’t be any compliance concerns related to disability regulations or other fair employment standards.

Documentation Is Key

In most states, it’s illegal to discipline or terminate an employee because the employee filed a workers’ compensation claim. This is considered retaliation, and employees are protected from this practice under workers’ compensation laws. By terminating an employee for filing a workers’ compensation claim, an employer could open themselves up to serious litigation issues. Employers can end up paying significant compensatory and punitive damages for retaliation claims.

But what happens when an employee’s behavior or attitude creates work performance issues? For example, an employee may fail to complete assigned work within the required time, be insubordinate to a supervisor or show up late to work—thus showcasing a poor work performance. As soon as these issues occur, the employer should start documenting them. This provides a foundation for the employer, helping them justify disciplinary action or termination—even if the employee has an open workers’ compensation claim.

However, suppose an employer only starts documenting issues after an employee makes a workers’ compensation claim, even though the behavior had already been occurring before the claim happened. In that case, it could seem as though the behavior became a problem only because of the workers’ compensation claim.

If an employee’s performance issues began after an injury or illness and during the open workers’ compensation claim, it should be noted in the employee’s personnel file with detailed notes. From there, the employer should complete a full investigation into what occurred. This way, the employer will have sufficient documentation in the event that the employee files a lawsuit against them for being disciplined or terminated during the course of an open claim.

Employers should also be consistent in their disciplinary and termination practices. If there’s no consistency, discrimination or wrongful termination claims could arise against the employer. It’s important that—when an employer is considering whether to discipline or terminate an employee—they follow these measures:

  • Document the employee’s misconduct.
  • Thoroughly investigate the misconduct.
  • Obtain witness statements (if applicable).
  • Record any disciplinary actions that the employee received, or provide reasons as to why no discipline was required.
  • Record the reason for the employee’s termination (including any documentation regarding a probationary period).

Documenting the situation with very detailed notes could help an employer defend themselves against any wrongful termination or discrimination claims that may occur.

Is it Retaliation?

Employer actions that could potentially be deemed unlawful retaliation when made against an employee with an open workers’ compensation claim include:

  • Changing the employee’s job tasks, even though the employee is still able to perform them
  • Changing the employee’s work schedule
  • Demoting the employee
  • Reducing the employee’s hours

If an employer is deemed to have wrongfully retaliated against an employee, they can be liable for various penalties, such as fines or—in severe cases—jail time.

What Happens to the Workers’ Compensation Claim if the Employee Is Terminated?

If an employee who has an open workers’ compensation claim is terminated, the claim will continue to stay open. The employer will still be responsible for the coverage of the employee’s occupational injury or illness—unless the insurance carrier, a state agency or a court determines otherwise.

It is usually in an employer’s best interest to keep an employee who has an open claim working. Doing so allows the employer to directly communicate with the employee, closely monitor the employee’s medical treatment progress and have more input as to what the employee is doing in recovery.

Employees who have been terminated, on the other hand, tend to be very hard to reach—which makes the employer’s task of following up with them that much more complicated. What’s more, an employer does not have the same kind of direct access to a terminated employee as they would have to an employee who continues working. This access can be helpful for monitoring the employee’s healing process and holding the employee accountable for following proper medical restrictions. If an employee is terminated and then hired by another company, it will become extremely difficult to make sure the employee follows their restrictions.

In any case, employers need to weigh the pros and cons of termination versus keeping an employee working. For instance, not terminating an insubordinate employee simply because they have an open workers’ compensation claim may end up being costlier than any potential retaliation claim that the employer could otherwise face for the termination itself. Each situation is different, but employers should always keep in mind that consistency is key when determining what kind of circumstances or employee actions may warrant termination.

Contact us today with any questions about workers’ compensation insurance.

California Senate Rejects Workers’ Compensation Proposal

Close one!

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The California Senate on Thursday rejected a bill aimed at making it easier for health care employees to have hospitals pay their medical bills related to COVID-19 and other diseases that may have been contracted on the job — a move business groups said would have cost them too much money.

Companies pay their workers’ medical bills if they get sick or injured while on the job. In some cases, workers must prove their injury or illness is work-related to get the benefits. Last year, the California Legislature passed a law that assumed COVID-19 was work-related, shifting the burden to employers to prove it wasn’t.

Photo by Hush Naidoo on Unsplash

That law is scheduled to expire in 2023. A bill by Sen. Dave Cortese, a Democrat from San Jose, would have made it permanent. It would have also added other presumptions to the workers’ compensation law for hospital workers, including cancer under some circumstances, post traumatic stress disorder, certain respiratory diseases and muscle or ligament injuries.

The bill had to pass the Senate by Friday to have a chance at becoming law this year. But it fell short on Thursday before the Senate adjourned for the week. Lawmakers are not meeting Friday.

Cortese on Thursday agreed to change the bill to remove respiratory illnesses such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). But it wasn’t enough to get the bill passed.

Cortese said his goal was to give hospital workers, of whom he says 90% are women, the same protections as other medical professions, including emergency medical technicians.

“It really comes down to equal work, equal compensation,” he said.

Business groups, led by the California Chamber of Commerce, opposed the bill, labeling it a “job killer.”

“Such a drastic shift in the law will create an astronomical financial burden on healthcare employers and the system, creating an appreciable pact on the cost of healthcare at a time when we are trying to make healthcare more affordable,” Ashley Hoffman, policy advocate for the California Chamber of Commerce, wrote in a letter to lawmakers that was signed by 35 other groups.

The bill is part of a broader discussion in California about which coronavirus modifications should continue. Gov. Gavin Newsom said he will lift most of the state’s coronavirus rules on June 15.

The state Senate passed a bill earlier this week that would let restaurants continue to serve alcohol outside. The state Assembly passed a bill that would require local governments to keep letting people comment during their meetings by telephone or the internet. Both bills still must pass the other legislative chamber and be signed by the governor before becoming law.

Written by Adam Beam, Associated Press (June 3, 2021)

https://www.westport-news.com/news/article/California-Senate-rejects-workers-compensation-16223712.php

The Risk with Search Engines

It’s no secret that your technology company depends on the capabilities of your computer systems to function. You should be aware that simple actions your employees take could be putting your company’s equipment and networks at risk of cyber-crime, including cyber-attacks, cyber theft and other computer security incidents. The average cost of a single cyber-attack is incalculable—cyber-attacks can directly target finances and ruin a business’ reputation. Your business is at stake, and you should do everything you can to protect yourself.


The Risks of Web Searches

As an employer, you should educate your employees about searching for certain topics on the internet due to the risk of coming across websites encrypted with viruses or malware that could be detrimental to your computer systems. Stress that the potential for cybercrime could affect employees individually as well as the business as a whole. More than 90 percent of companies surveyed by the DOJ incurred either monetary loss, system downtime loss or both because of cybercrime, so take it upon yourself to put search engine guidelines in place.


The Web’s Most Dangerous Search Terms

Common term searches conducted online one can expose your business to the risk of cyber-crime. Encourage employees to avoid following suspicious results in search engines. Any result that promises free products or materials is suspect. The least risky search terms are usually health-related topics and searches about economic news. It is essential to remember that the number of dangerous search terms is ever changing. Hackers want to impact

the highest amount of people with the least amount of effort, so they aim for popular search terms most. Ill-intentioned hackers also adapt quickly to the fast-paced nature of the internet and the public circle, so oftentimes social or celebrity events popular at a given moment climb quickly to the top of the internet’s most dangerous search terms and are a high risk for infecting your company’s computers. According to the DOJ, industries considered a part of critical infrastructure businesses account for a


Simple actions your employees take could put your company’s equipment and networks at risk of cyber-crime, including cyber-attack, cyber theft and other computer security incidents.


disproportionate amount of computer security incidents. If your company is in any of these industries, be especially careful about internet searches to ensure computer safety and protect against potentially devastating loss, both monetary and in down time:

  • Agriculture
  • Chemical and drug manufacturing
  • Computer system design
  • Finance
  • Health care
  • Internet service providers
  • Petroleum mining and manufacturing
  • Publications/broadcasting
  • Real estate
  • Telecommunications
  • Transportation and pipelines

Take Precautions to Protect Your Business


There are examples of companies and organizations around the globe that had to shut down operations to address a large-scale virus or other malware issue. These problems can affect both large and small businesses and can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars to fix. Avoid putting yourself at risk by doing the following:

  • Enact a stricter internet use policy
  • Put more strict website blockers or filters in place
  • Educate employees about the hazards that risky search engine exploration can present

Some of these solutions may cost you in the short run but lowering your risk will ultimately save your company in potential identity fraud, monetary cyber theft or informational cyber theft in the future.

NAPEO announces in-person conference opening back up for September 27-29, 2021

NAPEO‘s President, Mr. Pat Cleary has exciting news about future in-person meetings and events!

The following post was from an eMail to the members from NAPEO’s President, Mr.Pat Cleary regarding the status of upcoming events and the status on in-person attendance.


Ten months ago to the day, I sent an email stating that due to COVID-19 and the associated risks that the committee voted against having the annual SAGE event and conference. It was a heartbreaking email to write, in that the conference was a speck of hope for us all, something out in the far distance that we all looked forward to, when this damned thing would be over. But it was not to be. I attached the email here because re-reading it today, it’s a bit of a time capsule, and reminds us of a low point that we experienced – and survived – together.

So today I’m writing with some very good news: I just this hour signed our contract with the JW Marriott San Antonio Hill Country to hold our conference there – in person – on September 27 – 29 this year. Just about every conversation I have had with any NAPEO member over the past few months has included a discussion of when we would be able to meet again in person. We are all suffering Zoom fatigue, that’s for sure. Looking at the email below, I said, “We want to gather with our members, and as soon as it’s safe to do so, we will.” Every organization has its own level of risk tolerance. Our litmus throughout has been the health and safety of our members and of our team here at NAPEO. Comforted and fortified by the upward trend in vaccinations and downward trend in cases – and the slow easing of restrictions – we will hold our first in-person meeting, our CFO Seminar, at the end of June (location TBD) and hold our Georgia Leadership Council Forum in-person on June 28. And the conference in September. 

I’ve said so many times that the arc of meetings during COVID was like this: Plan the meeting, book the hotel, promote the meeting, watch the registrations climb, meeting draws near, registrations begin to cancel, then the meeting cancels. We did that dance too many times in 2020. For our November Board of Directors meeting, we asked our 24 Board members if they wanted to meet virtually or in person. Twenty two said they wanted to meet in person, so we planned the meeting. The week before, in the face of too many cancellations, we moved the meeting to virtual. It was a discouraging, defeating, and tiresome cycle.

So if the cancellation of the 2020 in-person conference was a sign of despair, let this now be a sign of hope, of light, and of hopefully reaching the end of this pernicious thing that has dogged us for so long. As I said in the email below, “The sun will shine again.” And indeed it will – in San Antonio, in September.

I want to thank all of you who have stood by us, who have gamely pivoted with us to the virtual world. It wasn’t a world we wanted, but it was the world we were handed. I want to especially thank our associate members. The face to face meeting is their lifeblood, an option they didn’t have for the past year. They, too, stood with us, and we are grateful. And finally, I want to thank my team here at NAPEO. I use the royal “we” all the time, but the truth is they are the ones who are doing the innovating, the pivoting, the work. 

As I always say, this thing isn’t completely over yet, but we appear to be moving in the right direction. I look forward to seeing – and celebrating with – you all in San Antonio. 

All the best,

Pat Cleary
President & CEO
NAPEO
707 N. St. Asaph St.
Alexandria, Va. 22314
703-739-8163